I’ll Know I’m Home When

Somewhere along the way, once I got the rhythm down pat, I began to note somewhat tongue-in-cheek differences between daily life on the Camino and home. But the more I listed the more I realized it’s an intimate glimpse of common pilgrim experiences you normally wouldn’t be aware of unless you’d undertaken the journey. I also began to have insights, reminders and resolutions related to some of them that I’ve included at the end.

I’ll know I’m home when…
   … I’m no longer looking for markers every few minutes to tell me where to go, except perhaps subliminally.
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   … I’ll no longer be walking continually for 4-8 hours on a daily basis, with the exception of a brief rest or rest day.
   … I’ll no longer be so consistently in nature.
   … I’ll no longer hear the continual click-click click-click of walking sticks telling me that a pilgrim is coming along the trail.
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   … I’ll no longer hear the well wishes Buen Camino spoken to me by nearly every pilgrim and so many locals, or say it myself, as we pass each other.
   … I’ll have a cat in my lap not observing one from a distance.
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   … I’ll no longer sit people watching, daily, at an outdoor café while having café and croissant, or a glass of wine and tapas.
   … I’ll have more than one change of clothing.
   … I’ll have more choices to wear on my feet than hiking shoes or flip flops.
   … I’ll keep my belongings in a closet or chest of drawers rather than a backpack.
   … I’ll no longer do my laundry on a daily basis rather than weekly.
   … I’ll no longer be required to vacate my lodging each day by 0800, or be restricted in any movement or slight noises between 2200-0630.
   … I’ll know on a consistent basis where I’ll lay my head each night.
   … I’ll no longer wear ear plugs.
   … If I’m sleeping in a roomful of people, I’ll know them all ahead and never in numbers between 12-100 in one room.
   … I’ll have as much privacy as I choose.
   … I’ll be able to sit upright in my bed without bumping my head on the bunk above me.
   … I’ll be sleeping between sheets, not in my sleeping bag.
   … I’ll take a shower for as long as I like without pushing a button every ten seconds to keep the water flowing.
   … I’ll no longer speak three languages, daily, sometimes all within one sentence—the latter because my brain isn’t adequately sorting.
   … I’ll no longer hear five or more languages around me or engage with so many different nationalities at once at any given point, daily.
   … I’ll be drinking French roast—strong and black—in the morning rather than café con leche.
   … I’ll return to my normal diet, rather than the “pilgrims menu” offered in restaurants.
This statement probably needs some explanation. Nearly every restaurant on the Camino offers a lower priced 3-course meal, limited options for each course, with bread, wine, coffee, or water included, typically between 9-12 euros. While offering benefit to pilgrims in the amount of food for a lower cost, they’re high carb, meat and potato meals, nearly devoid of vegetables, no fruit. Lots of gluten. Also typical of the entire other-than-pilgrim menu in Spain. I consumed more gluten, dairy, potatoes and meat in these two months than I’ve eaten in at least five years, maybe more.
My Take-Aways…
   1. It’s important to be alert to the lay of the land to avoid becoming lost or overlooking tell-tale signals that things are off track or hidden. I resolve to sharpen my peripheral and x-ray vision.
   2. Flexibility is a virtue. It’s also important to set your limits and abide by them. I resolve to identify with even more depth and breadth what is true for me.
   3. A simple life in the best sense is a pure one, devoid of clutter in the mind or unnecessary material goods, anything that weighs down the spirit. I resolve to uplevel my sorting and pitching process.
   4. Nature is a great gift, healer and stress reliever. I’m fortunate to live where I do. Nature—miles of it—is just outside my door. I resolve to do these things more: hike, take breaks, sit on the deck, notice the wildflowers—however small—and watch the lizards, birds and other wildlife. Absorb energy given by the moon, sun, stars, wind and rain with intent to return it in ways that are life-giving.
   5. Diverse encounters—people, places, new ways of doing things—make life rich and support intellectual, emotional and spiritual growth. I thrive on diversity and already seek it out but miss it at home. I resolve to discover more opportunities to insert myself in such foreign lands locally.
   6. I undertook this journey through willing choice. If you look at the list, you may notice there are aspects that are similar to those whose lives often aren’t through choice but circumstance. In a certain way, I had a light taste of what it’s like to be homeless, to experience restriction. The more days I walked the more this awareness settled on me. It increased my compassion toward anyone who finds themselves in such a place and has difficulty finding a way through. There’s always a way across a threshold. It also deepened the great gratitude I hold for having the life I do, and the capability of coming up with strategies to navigate the tricky times.
   7. The pilgrims I met on the Camino came from different walks of life, ages, cultures, circumstances, personalities but all held one thing in common: an intent to deepen their lives in some way. That’s the Spirit of the Camino…or any challenging spiritual journey really. It’s an initiation process, one so worth undertaking. You meet yourself coming and going resident in the land you travel and those you meet. You discover who you are. Then the grandest part of the journey is taking it all home to shape your daily living from that point on. I resolve to do so…as gracefully as possible and forgive myself when I stumble.
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   This may seem like quite a list of resolutions, maybe overwhelming. But…for me…it boils down to something core. Being present. When I think about it, that’s what the Camino reinforced to me overall. Be awake—fully. Then all starts to fall into place bit by bit: small adjustments build upon themselves and create alignment. That’s absolutely doable. It’s something I know.
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